• Keep a bag of frozen berries on hand for a quick wintertime smoothie made with non-fat milk, a ripe banana, and a handful of frozen berries.
  •  Regardless of what types of food a person eats, the basic rule concerning weight-loss is that to lose weight people must consume fewer calories than they expend. However, a limitation of intake need not be based on calories. A feeling of being full is another reason that people stop eating. In other words, don’t be a member of the clean your plate club!
  •  Latest research shows you need to shoot for 30-60 minutes of exercise 6-7 days a week!
  •  Healthy Snack Tip: lightly brown 2 teaspoons of pine nuts in a dry skillet (shake the pan so they don’t burn). Add 4 cups of just-washed, damp baby spinach and 2 tablespoons of raisins. Cover & cook about 2 minutes, just until the spinach is slightly wilted. Enjoy the nutrition!
  •  You can lose 10 pounds in just one year by eliminating only 100 calories from your diet every day (ie, 1 tablespoon of butter/margarine).
  •  You can gain 10 pounds in just one year by eating only 100 extra calories a day.
  •  Cranberry Juice Cocktail has more sugar than most soft drinks.
  •  Do you have Pre-Diabetes? People with pre-diabetes have blood sugar levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to be diabetic.
  •  The cut-offs depend on whether your blood is tested after a 12-hour fast (fasting blood sugar) or two hours after you’re given a glucose-laden liquid to drink (oral glucose tolerance test).
  •  As your weight increases so does your risk of heart disease, cancer, diabetes and death!
  •  Oscar Mayer Lunchables – bologna and American cheese has 7 1/2 teaspoons of saturated/trans fat. That is more than you get in a Big Mac.
  •  An ‘imitation’ product is one that resembles the original products, but is nutritionally inferior to it. A ‘substitute’ product resembles the original product, and is nutritionally equivalent to it.
  •  For a quick, healthy sandwich, stuff a whole-wheat pita with veggies like sliced tomato, cucumber, red pepper, and avocado. Top with some plain yogurt, crushed garlic and a drizzle of olive oil.
  •  The number of deaths that occur because of the excess sodium in the average American’s diet is equivalent to a jumbo jet crashing every single day! Getting rid of your salt shaker is not enough!
  •  If you have high blood pressure, in addition to medication, here is how to lower it: lose excess weight, follow a diet rich in fruit, vegetables, and low-fat dairy foods, exercise daily, limit salt intake to only 1,500 mg per day (this is a tough one), limit alcohol to 2 drinks a day for men and 1 drink a day for women.
  •  Americans sleep less than they used to and this could be part of the reason why more of us are now overweight. Too little sleep may make you hungry, especially for calorie-dense foods, and may prime your body to try to hold on to the calories you eat. It may also boost your insulin levels, which increases your risk of heart disease and diabetes.
  •  For a quick low salt and low fat topping for grilled shrimp, chicken, or fish, make a fresh salsa by chopping 1 pint of cherry tomatoes, 1/4 red or white onion, and a handful of cilantro. For some heat, add a minced jalapeno. Toss with the juice of 1/2 a lime.
  •  Most people in the Pacific Northwest have Vitamin D levels that are far below ideal standards. Every person in the upper two-thirds of the United States should have their Vitamin D level checked. If your level is below ideal, it is essential to raise your intake to the amount required to achieve the 50-70th percentile for Vitamin D.
  •  For an easy, versatile marinade, mix 1/4 cup orange juice, 1/4 tsp. salt, 1 tsp. fresh thyme, freshly ground black pepper, and 2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil. Pour over 1 lb. of chicken, salmon or shrimp and grill over medium heat.
  •  Weight Loss Tip – Set a realistic time schedule (1 to 2 pounds a week). To lose a pound of body fat, you must eliminate 3500 calories. A combination of sound and balanced eating and increased exercise and less time spent being sedentary is the best route. For example: A decrease of 500 calories a day plus an increase in exercise to burn an additional 500 calories a day would equal a weekly deficit of 7,000 calories or two pounds!
  •  Try something new with your asparagus. Roast a shiitake or crimini mushrooms, shave raw spears into a green salad, or saute bite-sized bits with slivered almonds and toss with brown rice.
  •  Chuck vs. Sirloin – which is better? Although there’s big difference in price, there is little difference in the amount of protein between these cuts of meat.
  •  Select cuts that give the most lean meat for the money. Avoid cuts with a large amount of gristle, bone, and fat.
  •  Cuts of meat containing more fat are usually more tender. However, these are usually more expensive and higher in saturated fat than leaner cuts.
  •  A peach is a peach is a peach…isn’t it? Generic food items are a great money-saving idea. You can spot them in their plain packages. Nutritionally, generic foods are similar to name brands. The difference is in the size and shape of the pieces. Serve generic foods instead of the higher cost name brands or try them in dishes like casseroles, soups, and salads where the size and shape of the food isn’t important.
  •  Boil your brown rice in plenty of water, just like when you boil your pasta. When the rice is soft, pour off the remaining water. You’ll slash the cooking time (from 50 minutes to a half hour), and you won’t have to worry about scorching the pot.
  •  A good diabetes defense is to change liquids you drink. For instance, instead of soft drinks, fruit drinks, energy drinks or fruit juice; switch to water unsweetened coffee or tea.
  •  Want to boost your brain size? Go for a brisk walk…every day! You can push yourself back two to three years with just six months of aerobic exercise.
  •  Nothing beats homemade guacamole. Roughly mash the flesh of 1 avocado. Mix in 2 Tbsp. diced sweet onion, 6 diced cherry tomatoes, and juice of 1/2 a lime, and (if you want some heat) 1 minced jalapeno pepper.
  •  Did you know that for good health you need 60 minutes of physical activity on most days? 60 minutes is a great goal but don’t worry if it seems like too much to do at one time. Try being active for just 10 minutes and see how may 10-minute moves you can do each day. Try them during a work break or while you’re watching the news.
  •  Cut an acorn squash in half and scoop out the seeds. Put 1 Tbsp. of olive oil and 1 Tbsp. of orange juice in the well of each half. Sprinkle liberally with fresh-ground pepper. Cover and bake at 350 degrees until soft (about 1 hour).
  •  Ginkgo won’t prevent your brain from sliding into dementia. Don’t depend on supplements to keep your mind sharp. Instead, eat a healthy diet and step up your exercise. This may protect your brain by lowering your risk of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease. Keeping your mind active also helps (this does not include watching television).
  •  Toss the florets from a head of cauliflower with 2 Tbsp. of extra-virgin olive oil and (no more than) 1/8 tsp. of salt. Roast at 450 degrees on a large baking sheet, turning once or twice, until tender and golden, about 30 minutes.
  •  Eating more fresh or frozen (not canned) vegetables may lower your risk of heart disease and stroke. The potassium in vegetables (and fruits) helps lower your blood pressure and bone loss. And vegetables’ bulk may help fill you up without filling you out.
  •  Want to work more vegetables into your diet? Toss a bag of baby spinach into your pasta sauce. Or add a handful of broccoli florets or frozen peas to your brown rice or whole wheat pasta a few minutes before it is done.
  •  Allow kids (and yourself) one to two hours per day to spend on TV, video games or fun time on the computer. Watching TV is the #1 after school (or after work) activity for many kids (and adults). Sometimes they just need ideas for what else they can do. Brainstorm with your kids (or with your spouse) and create a “Top 10” list of activities to get them on their feet after school. Activities can include active play such as riding bikes or shooting baskets, walking the dog, doing household tasks or even helping to prepare dinner. Post the list right on the fridge so kids can pick an activity when they get home from school (or work).
  •  Make a quick salad for four. Whisk together 2 Tbsp. canola oil, 1 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar, 1/8 tsp. salt, and 1/4 tsp. honey. Drizzle over 2 cups each watercress and endive, 1 sliced apple, and 1/4 cup walnuts.
  •  Add a little nutritious crunch to your salads. Sprinkle on some toasted almonds or sesame seeds. Or toss in a bit of chopped cucumber, bell pepper, raw corn kernels, jicama, carrot, or apple.
  •  For a refreshing summer cooler, put 4 cups of watermelon chunks (no seeds), 1 cup of ice, and the juice of half a lime into a blender. Blend until smooth.
  •  Research shows that both parents and kids are more emotionally fit if they eat regularly scheduled meals together. Kids who eat regularly with their families also eat more nutritious food, have higher grades and are less likely to get involved in alcohol and drugs.
  •  Need exercise and stuck inside? Blow up a balloon and play volleyball. Get an exercise DVD from the library. Ride an exercise bike. Turn on your favorite music and just dance! Do inside chores like vacuuming, dusting, or emptying the garbage. Do gymnastics or stretching. Play ‘Twister.’
  •  Never skip breakfast! Breakfast powers up your body and your brain. It provides energy to move throughout the day. If you are not hungry in the mornings, look at the quantity of food you are eating the night before. Cut back this quantity and your a.m. appetite will start to return.
  •  No time to eat? Grab and go! Make a breakfast smoothie (yogurt and fruit in a blender) for the road or grab one of the following; high fiber cereal bar, whole wheat bagel, low fat muffin, piece of fruit, box of raisins, string cheese, yogurt drink, individual serving of 1% or skim milk, cup of applesauce or fruit, or yogurt.
  •  What fruit has the vitamin C of an orange, the potassium of half a banana, and the fiber of a half-cup of bran flakes? The Kiwi. Cut up a couple of kiwis with orange segments, mango slices, and pomegranate seeds. Or make a salad with slices of kiwi, cucumber, avocado, celery, and shredded cooked chicken with buttermilk dressing. Yum-yum.
  •  Be size wise. Eating a supersize portions can slow us down and give us more calories than we need. So next time order a smaller burger and smaller fries (or skip the fries and order fruit). Then balance it out. If lunch is a big meal, work in a family walk or another favorite activity and go light with soup and salad for dinner.
  •  You’re on the go getting from one place to another and you find yourself hungry. Of course you stop at a convenience store – it’s convenient! Here are some ideas to choose for a healthier snack; individual package of pretzels or whole wheat crackers, small bag of peanuts, string cheese or cheese stick, lowfat chocolate milk, cereal bar or granola bar (don’t choose glorified candy bars), banana, apple, orange, individual package of fig bars, small package of sunflower seeds, frozen yogurt or juice bar.
  •  Portion Distortion! It’s all about HOW MUCH you eat that counts. Do you (or your kids) sometimes feel healthy eating is boring? Not true! You (and the kids) can eat healthy and still enjoy those favorites like chips, cookies and candy. All foods can fit into a healthy eating plan. The trick is to stick to what a portion size or serving size really is.
  •  Jumbo, large, medium, small? No matter what size you buy, eggs are an excellent and inexpensive source of protein. Make eggs a part of our main meals by serving omelets, quiches, and don’t forget to add the nutrient rich vegetables.
  •  Healthy meals don’t just happen, you have to create them. If you walk through the door at night – tired, hungry and faced with an empty refrigerator – you’re setting yourself up for poor food choices.
  •  Start a food diary so you can discover your problem areas and problem foods. You might find that you don’t really want or need that cheese slice on your sandwich or burger. You might find that you make great choices all day long until you plop in front of the TV at night.
  •  Ingredients are listed in descending order – the closer to the top an ingredient is, the more of it is found in the food. When it comes to whole grain cereal, bread or pasta, the first ingredient should be a whole grain such as 100% whole wheat, whole oats, etc.
  •  Peel a banana from the bottom and you won’t have to pick the ‘little stringy things’ off of it. Take your bananas apart when you get home from the store. If you leave them connected at the stem, they ripen faster.
  •  Store your opened chunks of cheese in aluminum foil. It will stay fresh longer and not mold.
  •  Peppers with 3 bumps on the bottom are sweeter and better for eating raw. Peppers with 4 bumps on the bottom are firmer and better for cooking.
  •  For a quick, guaranteed to please dip, puree in a food processor: a 15 oz. can (drained and rinsed) Great Northern, navy, or other white beans, 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil, 1 clove garlic and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.
  •  Add garlic immediately to a recipe if you want a light taste of garlic and at the end of the recipe if you want a stronger taste of garlic.
  •  The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommends a daily water intake of 91 ounces for healthy women and 125 ounces for healthy men. Water needs increase with factors such as strenuous physical activity, hot and cold temperature extremes, and being ill with fever, diarrhea or vomiting. About 80% of water intake comes from beverages and about 20% comes from foods.